Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice (ACRJ)

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Asian-communities-for-reproductive-justice-acrj
Headquarters Location: Oakland, CA
Founded: 1999


Mission: ACRJ promotes and protects reproductive justice through organizing, building leadership capacity, developing alliances and education to achieve community and systemic change. We believe reproductive justice will be achieved when all people have the economic, social and political power and resources to make healthy decisions about our gender, bodies and sexuality for ourselves, our families and our communities.


Tags: national, women's reproductive health, advocacy, health equity, sex education, leadership development, 2010


Asian-communities-for-reproductive-justice-acrj
Story: Read about what Eveline Shen, the Executive Director of ACRJ has to say: Climate change, toxic work environments and immigrant women workers are just some of the issues that Eveline Shen links to women's reproductive health. Going beyond the issues… Read the full story.

Expert Reviews: Evidence of Impact
Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice are lauded for addressing a contentious issue within a population that needs targeted intervention. This organization is viewed as a thought leader in its space and experts cited contributions across a spectrum of areas.
See the complete expert review.

Leadership
Asian-communities-for-reproductive-justice-acrj Eveline Shen. Eveline has led ACRJ since 1999. Under her leadership, ACRJ is recognized for its innovative leadership in the Reproductive Justice Movement in working with grassroots communities, providing thought leadership, developing effective tools and resources for evaluation, training and documentation, and organizing for long term systemic change. Eveline serves on the board of the Reproductive Health Technologies Project and Movement Strategy… See full bio.


Transparency Information
Silver-big
This organization has earned the GuideStar Participation Level Silver, demonstrating its commitment to transparency (learn more)


Financial Data
Total Revenue:
$701,409


From the Nonprofit
The nonprofit has not added any comments yet. If you are a representative of this nonprofit and would like to leave a comment, please email us at feedback@myphilanthropedia.org with your request.


Contact Info
E-Mail:
info AT reproductivejustice.org
Phone:
510-663-8300
Facebook:
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Address:
1440 Broadway Ste 301
 
Oakland, CA 94612, USA
Twitter:
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Asian-communities-for-reproductive-justice-acrj Story: Read about what Eveline Shen, the Executive Director of ACRJ has to say: Climate change, toxic work environments and immigrant women workers are just some of the issues that Eveline Shen links to women's reproductive health. Going beyond the issues of access to appropriate health care or even nutrition, Shen's mission is to improve women's health--particularly those of color--by interjecting the concept of justice throughout her work. "A person has reproductive justice when they can drink water and not be worried about reproductive health," says Shen, the executive director of the Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice. "A person has reproductive justice when he or she can adopt, regardless of his or her sexual orientation. A person has reproductive justice when they can walk safely at night, free from physical or sexual violence, and when they are able to receive appropriate health care (if) they are transgender." Shen explains that the concept of reproductive justice emerged in 1994 from a group of African American women during an informal caucus at a national pro-choice conference in Chicago. That was around the time Shen, a first-generation Chinese American, was completing her master's degree in public health at the University of California, Berkeley, and starting an internship at the Oakland, Calif.-based organization. While still a student, Shen created and implemented an educational training program for 14-year-old Southeast Asian girls to teach them about self-defense, sex education, media advocacy, body image and the importance of teen health clinics. This work became the foundation for the group's youth organizing project curriculum, now called Sisters in Action for Issues of Reproductive Empowerment. The program is comprised of low-income teenage girls who organized to get a medical waste incinerator moved out of a low-income area in Oakland. They also educate their peers about the harmful chemicals contained in personal body care products. Shen says through these efforts, the teens are learning about the connection between climate justice and reproductive justice. Shen has also worked to elevate the importance of reproductive justice issues to meet the world's changing needs for the past decade. Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice embraces several objectives: creating conditions so women of color and their communities can thrive, securing rights for immigrant women workers and youth and pursuing racial and environmental justice. She supervises a staff of 10 and manages an annual budget of $1 million. "In the U.S. many women of color and immigrant women work in low-wage toxic industries," says Shen. "It is not enough for climate change solutions to focus only on the levels of pollution emitted by industries, but we must also consider the working conditions and toxic exposures faced by these workers who bear the greatest burden." (Read more at: http://www.womensenews.org/story/21-leaders-the-21st-century/091221/2010-seven-who-build-autonomy)

Expert Reviews of Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice (ACRJ)

Evidence of Impact Summary:

Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice are lauded for addressing a contentious issue within a population that needs targeted intervention. This organization is viewed as a thought leader in its space and experts cited contributions across a spectrum of areas.
See expert comments.

Organization Strengths Summary:

Most every expert cited leadership and program design quality as examples of this organization's strength.
See expert comments.

Areas for Improvement Summary:

Areas from improvement were varied for this organization. Elements like communications and marketing appeared multiple times. Others wanted iterations in program design to maximize impact and/or address new sub topics or sub communities.
See expert comments.

Expert Comments: Evidence of Impact

Select the boxes to display the results according to expert type.

Show:
X
Foundation Professionals (F)
X
Researchers and Faculty (R)
X
Nonprofit Senior Staff (N)
X
Other (consultants, journalists, policy makers) (O)

Impact

F
They provide a strong articulation of reproductive justice and how it impacts different communities. They are a strong coalition builder across multiple issues.
F
In multiple ways, they have been on the forefront of the reproductive movement--first in providing analysis of a justice frame that broadens the focus of reproductive organizations and then in building a national alliance of organizations to collective move forward a shared agenda.
F
Their "train the trainer" program for nail salon workers was meaningful. They have released six editions of the Momentum Series. They are designed to document our dialogues as well as provide tools, models and resources that highlight and magnify the exciting work of reproductive justice groups and other allies. Finally, a mind-body practice that helps individuals and organizations proactively faces the personal and professional challenges of organizing and movement building.
F
This is a true thought leader in the field of reproductive justice. Their training and writing has helped bring new social justice allies into the reproductive health, rights, and justice movement, and has helped to build a bigger, stronger base to pushing for policy change. Their work to build support within communities of color to take a position against parental notification in California is noteworthy and creative.
F
Over the past ten years, ACRJ has shut down an East Oakland toxic medical waste incinerator that was causing major environmental health problems for the community, authored and published the seminal paper A New Vision, now the most widely used definition of reproductive justice in the U.S., won regulatory changes at the state level to protect the reproductive health of nail salon workers, and supported over 500 national opinion leaders, policymakers, coalition and networks, think tanks, foundations, universities, and other entities with tools, training, and technical assistance to develop their understanding of reproductive justice as a powerful framework for community and systemic change.
R
They have played a significant role in developing and launching the reproductive justice framework; they have facilitated an alliance work among race/ethnic-specific reproductive justice organizations and between rights & health organizations and justice organizations.
R
While a California-based organization, I think they have national impact. I have been impressed by their ability to help define reproductive justice and to be instrumental in helping other organizations take up the mantle of reproductive justice by clearly defining it and distinguishing it as a separate movement. Thus, their impact has been one of empowering others.
N
Their paper on reproductive justice was an incredible and much needed addition to the field. They pull groups into cohorts and provide a resource to advance work that is already happening allows organizations to really contribute their time and energy in a real way.
N
They are effective at organizing a broad-coalition of other reproductive justice groups that lays the groundwork for future wins of all kinds. They have effectively shifted thinking and actions within broader reproductive health and rights movement about how to advance a reproductive justice agenda.
N
Their written documents that have made a huge impact on women's issues in general and reproductive justice in particular. The voice that the organization offers other is unparalleled.
N
ACRJ has been the group that has defined reproductive justice, lived that work, helping to defeat California's proposition 4 (a parental notification law), documenting the effective outreach and organizing it did to win this victory, and sponsoring extensive national work to replicate their successful reproductive justice approaches. ACRJ models successful movement building demonstrating that pro-choice victories are possible -- even on very hard issues like parental notification if we listen to the communities most affected and if we work with allied social justice movements.
N
They organize on a local level, working with young Asian Pacific Islander girls and developing campaigns on reproductive justice issues that resonate with a diverse community. They created a national/state network on reproductive justice organizations working together to build a stronger and diverse movement.
N
They wrote the very first analysis of the reproductive justice framework after Sister Song introduced it in 2003. Their training and writing through various initiatives also signify impact. Their leadership on Environmental Health and Labor issues through advocacy in nail salons as also important. Finally, their youth organizing work around issues of reproductive justice have been significant.
N
They authored the seminal document defining reproductive justice.


Expert Comments: Organization Strengths

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X
Foundation Professionals (F)
X
Researchers and Faculty (R)
X
Nonprofit Senior Staff (N)
X
Other (consultants, journalists, policy makers) (O)

Leadership

F
They have strong leadership, staff, fundraising and finances, research and public education, and coalition building.
F
They have one of the deepest benches I have seen and the many staff members at the organization are truly talented, capable leaders. Their vision goes beyond their own institution and they strive to have a movement wide perspective that I find rare in a nonprofit.
F
The addition of nationally regarded RJ trainer Moira Bowman, formally of Western States Center, as Director of the EMERJ program, and the increased visibility of three staff who have stepped up to serve as the public face of ACRJ, demonstrate a strong leadership pipeline. ACRJ's staff and board are 80 percent women of color, 60 percent multilingual, 30 percent immigrant or refugee, 50 percent LGBT, and 35 percent are between the ages of 25-35 (strongly representative of their constituency). One of their strengths is producing publications that provide funders and the grantee community with clarity on often complex issues - such as the connection between reproductive health and environmental issues - or toolkits that demystify campaign work and enable more organizations to get involved in RJ organizing - such as their sex-ed toolkit.
R
Executive Director Eveline Shen has set up a strong organization structure that is based on staff input and provides avenues for leadership development within the organization.
R
I have been impressed by the leadership and the organization of this group.
N
The leadership of the organization is exceptional as is their organizing strategies. The Executive Director is a mentor and facilitator of other leaders in a way that I have not seen replicated anywhere else.
N
Their leadership is strong and I love the way that this organization is able to organize their constituency. It's a lovely contradiction to have Asian women speaking boldly about reproductive justice.
N
Their leadership is visionary. It contributes to developing and implementing the reproductive justice framework locally and state-wide.
N
They are practicing an innovative form of transformational leadership and coalition building that focuses on sustainability and effectiveness.

Program Design

F
They are thought leaders in the field of reproductive justice. They are smart about how they use their resources to elevate the voices of women of color and to advance strategic thinking to move the field forward.
F
This organization is the think tank for the reproductive justice field. Their vision goes far beyond institutional ego to think of the entire field and what is needed. They are extremely effective at building strong and lasting relationships with others in the field, and are skilled long term big picture thinkers. They have also done excellent work on fighting off parental notification ballot initiatives in CA.
N
They are able to really put the reproductive justice framework into action. They also turn around their products quickly.
N
They have become a leader in the reproductive justice movement, reaching out to and seeking input from a wide range of organizations and leaders, working to create the tools and resources needed to replicate successful strategies, and then sharing them with a broad range of allies.

Fundraising

F
They are successful at accessing funding from a broader cross section of funders and donors. They are at the forefront of bringing together women of color led organizations to engage in new and meaningful ways to broaden and deepen support for reproductive justice across social justice movements.

Staff

N
The staff members are all strong in their own areas; they have a strong program and research staff. They have a strong communications capacity. They have excellent policy analysis and work in multi-ethnic coalitions on advocacy issues at the state and community level.

Field Leadership & Programming

N
They build reproductive justice movements. They do a great job with developing the documentation and tools to create strategic collaborations and trainings for activists.

Leadership & Program Design

N
This is a thought leader in the area of reproductive justice. Its broad-based mission and community, its innovative approach to issues, and its strong leadership make it one of the organizations setting the standards on these issues.


Expert Comments: Areas for Improvement

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X
Foundation Professionals (F)
X
Researchers and Faculty (R)
X
Nonprofit Senior Staff (N)
X
Other (consultants, journalists, policy makers) (O)

Marketing

F
They could do better with social media and marketing to get their ideas and information out.

Operations

F
They are currently revamping our accounting systems, have just moved our offices to a larger location, and in 2010 will be focusing on organizational development and systems.

More Focus

F
I think they know this, but they are now in the place where they need to learn where to say "no" in order to be focused and continue to grow in a sustainable way.

Growing pains

F
As an increasing number of organizations look to ACRJ for leadership and capacity building support, their challenge will be to maintain the strength of their own local organizing work as a powerful testing ground for strategies that they can then export/help other groups replicate across the country. The success with which they will be able to meet these two demands will depend on their ability to tap into resources, as they are 'graduating' out of the portfolios of funders who support smaller groups, and while they have secured some large foundation funding, have yet to land on the portfolios of many of the larger foundations that could support their work.

Planning

F
They should translate the big picture, long-term vision into more short-term, strategic gains.

Communication

N
I think that they often communicate their work in too much non-profit jargon. I would like to see more accessible language in their work. I would also like to have a clear understanding with the roles and function of their initiatives.

Communications

N
This nonprofit can improve their communications strategies in order to be seen as the leader it is outside of the reproductive health and rights movement. Their on-the-ground movement-building efforts are excellent and can serve as a model for others, but need to be able to engage with others through communications strategies.

More Collaboration

N
They have the visibility and ability to partner across difference - and connected to that partner with more mainstream people - who may/may not be aware/educated about their philosophical approach.
N
This organization could be even more effective by working more closely with birthing rights organizations and by seeing birth justice as fully part of reproductive justice. Very often it is possible to broaden the debate and expand the base by comparing what is being done on abortion issues with what is not being done on birthing issues. While it is generally not true that abortion laws are needed because women getting abortions are not "truly" informed, it is in fact true that many women going to give birth are actually not informed of the likelihood that they will be subjected to unnecessary, highly medicalized procedures. There are many allies to be found in that movement and this will be a group likely to find them.

More Advocacy

N
They could use a stronger policy and communications voice.

Program Design

N
They could use more integration of human rights framework and self-help process in their reproductive justice analysis and trainings.

Bench Depth

N
Do they have a succession plan? It's not clear that if Eveline leaves the organization will continue to thrive.


Leadership

Asian-communities-for-reproductive-justice-acrj
Eveline Shen
Executive Director
Eveline has led ACRJ since 1999. Under her leadership, ACRJ is recognized for its innovative leadership in the Reproductive Justice Movement in working with grassroots communities, providing thought leadership, developing effective tools and resources for evaluation, training and documentation, and organizing for long term systemic change. Eveline serves on the board of the Reproductive Health Technologies Project and Movement Strategy Center and is a member of the Center for American Progress’ National Women’s Health Leadership Network. During the past 8 years, she has also served as Principal Investigator for two National Institutes of Health grants that explore the intersection between environmental justice and reproductive justice. Eveline was recently named by Women’s E-news as one of the 21 leaders for the 21st Century. She is a 2009 Gerbode Fellow and holds a Masters in Public Health from UC Berkeley in Community Health Education.

From the Nonprofit

The nonprofit has not added any comments yet. If you are a representative of this nonprofit and would like to leave a comment, please email us at feedback@myphilanthropedia.org with your request.


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