PATH (Program for Appropriate Technology in Health)

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Path-program-for-appropriate-technology-in-health
Headquarters Location: Seattle, WA
Founded: 1977


Mission: PATH is an international nonprofit organization that transforms global health through innovation. We take an entrepreneurial approach to developing and delivering high-impact, low-cost solutions, from lifesaving vaccines to collaborative programs with communities. Through our work in more than 70 countries, PATH and our partners empower people to achieve their full potential.


Tags: water, diarrhea, hygiene, nutrition, breastfeeding, appropriate technologies, publications, research, maternal and child health, reproductive health, vaccines and immunization, emerging and epidemic diseases, health technologies, 2011


Path-program-for-appropriate-technology-in-health
Story: A new vaccine’s powerful potential

On the first day the vaccine was available in his village, Julien Bonboungou closed his hairdressing shop in the mid-afternoon and walked toward the local health center. There, he waited his turn to be vaccinated… Read the full story.

Expert Reviews: Evidence of Impact
Most experts mention PATH's user driven approach. For example, they conduct research which translates into guidelines that help people design products that users desire. They utilize market-based principles in the delivery of WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) projects, and they deliver a critical viewpoint on consumer needs and preferences for WASH products. They are known to disseminate their findings widely and have a strong program.
See the complete expert review.

Leadership
Path-program-for-appropriate-technology-in-health Molly Joel Coye. Molly Joel Coye, MD, MPH, is interim president and CEO of PATH and chair of our board of directors. She is also chief innovation officer for the UCLA Health System at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she oversees initiatives that promote innovation across the UCLA Health System to improve health care locally, nationally, and globally. Dr. Coye’s career… See full bio.


Transparency Information
Silver-big
This organization has earned the GuideStar Participation Level Silver, demonstrating its commitment to transparency (learn more)


Financial Data
Charity Navigator Rating: 4stars (profile)
Total Revenue:
$264,120,854


From the Nonprofit
The nonprofit has not added any comments yet. If you are a representative of this nonprofit and would like to leave a comment, please email us at feedback@myphilanthropedia.org with your request.


Contact Info
E-Mail:
info AT path.org
Phone:
206-285-3500
Facebook:
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Address:
PO Box 900922
 
Seattle, WA 98109, USA
Twitter:
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Path-program-for-appropriate-technology-in-health Story: A new vaccine’s powerful potential

On the first day the vaccine was available in his village, Julien Bonboungou closed his hairdressing shop in the mid-afternoon and walked toward the local health center. There, he waited his turn to be vaccinated against a disease that, with terrifying regularity, kills or disables thousands in sub-Saharan Africa, including Julien’s best friend from school, Hervé Compaore.

Hervé died at age 17 in 2006, one of 3,802 people killed when an epidemic wave of meningococcal meningitis A swept through portions of Africa, including the West African country of Burkina Faso. Since the epidemics began more than a century ago, people who live in the “meningitis belt”—from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia in the east—have had little protection against the disease. With devastating speed, it kills about one in ten people who get it and leaves one in four survivors permanently impaired by mental disorders or hearing loss.

In December 2010, health officials in Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso introduced a new vaccine that protects people from the type of meningitis that causes almost all epidemics of the disease in Africa. Called MenAfriVac™, the vaccine can be given safely to children as young as one year old. It should provide protection for ten years or more and blocks transmission of the disease to those who aren’t infected. And it does so at an affordable price—less than US$0.50 a dose.

For those reasons, health authorities believe, MenAfriVac™ has the potential to end epidemic meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. One day, an end to epidemics

“We’re going to put an end to these epidemics. Full stop.”

“If all of this works the way we think it’s going to work,” says Dr. Marc LaForce, director of the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP), “we’re going to put an end to these epidemics. Full stop.”

MVP, a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO), developed MenAfriVac™. Because the vaccine blocks transmission of the meningococcal bacteria, it can create “herd immunity,” protecting even those who are not vaccinated—if a large enough percentage of the population is immunized.

If enough people receive the vaccine, WHO estimates, MenAfriVac™ will protect 450 million people from the disease, and it will save nearly 150,000 lives. And epidemic meningitis A could be a memory.

By the last days of 2010, nearly 20 million people had received MenAfriVac™. In the next few years, PATH and WHO plan to bring the vaccine to between 300 million and 315 million more children and young adults, ages 1 through 29, in the meningitis belt.

Both organizations are working to build support for sustaining the immunization effort. But even at less than $0.50 cents a dose, it will take an additional $475 million to protect people throughout the region. Funding has not yet been identified.

People standing outdoors, lined up to be vaccinated.

In Julien’s village, neighbors line up for MenAfriVac™. To protect a village

The afternoon temperatures are rising in Julien’s village, but his neighbors continue to arrive and join the line for vaccine. The reason is simple, Julien explains. Everyone’s family has been touched by meningitis: an aunt deafened, a daughter who can no longer attend school, a little brother dead.

But for now, Julien greets his neighbors with a broad smile and a handshake. The gathering begins to feel less like a public health campaign and more like a celebration. Someone asks Julien: Is it worth it to be so hopeful? After all, what can one vaccine do?

He looks his questioner in the eye as he answers. “It’s going to protect my village,” he says.

Expert Reviews of PATH (Program for Appropriate Technology in Health)

Evidence of Impact Summary:

Most experts mention PATH's user driven approach. For example, they conduct research which translates into guidelines that help people design products that users desire. They utilize market-based principles in the delivery of WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) projects, and they deliver a critical viewpoint on consumer needs and preferences for WASH products. They are known to disseminate their findings widely and have a strong program.
See expert comments.

Organization Strengths Summary:

Most experts mention that one of PATH's unique strengths is their cutting-edge market-based approaches. Their researches are innovative in trying to understand the needs and motives of users. PATH also shares their knowledge widely and does so effectively.
See expert comments.

Areas for Improvement Summary:

Experts mention that some ways PATH can improve is their ability to help people who the market doesn't serve as easily. They can also develop stronger links to local businesses and develop more on-the-ground presence. They currently are more focused on household products and can improve by expanding into products that address consumer interactions with infrastructure.
See expert comments.

Expert Comments: Evidence of Impact

Select the boxes to display the results according to expert type.

Show:
X
Foundation Professionals (F)
X
Researchers and Faculty (R)
X
Nonprofit Senior Staff (N)
X
Other (consultants, journalists, policy makers) (O)

Strong Programs

N
They have great programming, are honest about the results, their results are positive, and have great leadership on the water side.
N
They have strong programming.

User Focused

N
They contribute to the evidence base and knowledge of how to utilize market-based principles in the delivery of WaSH projects (e.g. Safe Water Project).
R
PATH completes research on water products in order to design and develop improved products that users desire. Their guidelines for product development are an amazing guide to people designing products for the developing world, and their work in manufacturing products with private companies to high quality standards is revolutionizing the ceramic filter industry in Asia.
O
Their impact is demonstrated where "recipients" are purchasing services, which is an indication of a long-term solution.
R
PATH works in many different places and delivers a critical viewpoint on consumer needs and preferences for WASH products. In addition, they do a great job of communicating their findings to a broad audience.

Long Term Focus

R
They are very thoughtful and careful in their approach. They look towards practical solutions that involve both commercial and subsidized approaches.
N
I believe PATH has a strong philosophy and long-term focus in seeking market-based household water treatment options. They are looking for ways to make efforts in safe water more sustainable and market-driven, while understanding economic realities, complexities involved, and the need for non-profits like themselves. They are typically well-represented at academic conferences and forums.


Expert Comments: Organization Strengths

Select the boxes to display the results according to expert type.

Show:
X
Foundation Professionals (F)
X
Researchers and Faculty (R)
X
Nonprofit Senior Staff (N)
X
Other (consultants, journalists, policy makers) (O)

Market-Based Approach Research

N
Great leadership. Great programming, looking at market-based approaches in creative ways.
R
PATH's strengths are their high-quality research and design staff that leads the world in developing products for health in developing countries.
O
They offer cutting-edge market-based approaches. They focus on understanding needs and motives of users, and are great at sharing and summarizing technical options/information.

Shares Knowledge with the Field

N
Contributes to the field by presenting at conferences and sharing its work with others in multiple formats (reports, presentations, videos, and advocacy campaigns such as defeatDD).

Innovative Approach

R
Their strength is their presentation style - their approach to presentations, PowerPoint, etc is *extremely* effective! It is always a great talk and we could all learn a lot from them. I also appreciate their approach to learning-- PATH researchers use innovative techniques such as real-time monitoring (videotaping) of the use of their prototypes and products to learn more about consumers' needs.
N
They are very thoughtful and have some great ideas on how to actually sell and market products that is pretty unique in the sector.


Expert Comments: Areas for Improvement

Select the boxes to display the results according to expert type.

Show:
X
Foundation Professionals (F)
X
Researchers and Faculty (R)
X
Nonprofit Senior Staff (N)
X
Other (consultants, journalists, policy makers) (O)

Help Marginalized Populations

N
Need to think about how to address challenges with people that the market does not support so easily.

Lack On-The-Ground Presence

R
PATH is not an implementer - they work through other organizations. This lack of on-the-ground presence is a lack.

Stronger Link to Local Private Sectors

O
They can have a stronger link to local private sector - pushing local groups to lead design efforts.

Expand to Consumer Interactions with Infrastructure

R
PATH is quite focused on household products such as point of use water treatment devices. However, I think it would be great if they would expand their view to consumer interactions with infrastructure, such as hand pumps, private/public taps, latrines, etc. Perhaps they have already done this but we certainly hear less about it.

Don't have Broad Reach

N
A weakness I see is that they tend to be focused on several key countries but don't yet have a broad reach among many countries (though this "weakness" may simply be where they are with respect to their history and strategy).


Leadership

Path-program-for-appropriate-technology-in-health
Molly Joel Coye
Interim President and CEO
Molly Joel Coye, MD, MPH, is interim president and CEO of PATH and chair of our board of directors. She is also chief innovation officer for the UCLA Health System at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she oversees initiatives that promote innovation across the UCLA Health System to improve health care locally, nationally, and globally. Dr. Coye’s career has spanned academia and the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Prior to joining UCLA, she served as a senior advisor at the Public Health Institute in Oakland, California, where she advised domestic and international programs on innovation and technology. Prior to that, she was founder and CEO of the Health Technology Center (HealthTech), a nonprofit organization that became the premier forecasting institution for emerging technologies in health care. She also cofounded and was CEO of CalRHIO, California’s first statewide health information exchange organization. Dr. Coye has been the health commissioner in two states, an executive for a large medical group and a health software company, and a consultant with the World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization, and other institutions in Latin America and Asia.

Dr. Coye currently serves on the boards of Aetna, Inc., one of the largest health insurers in the United States, and the American Telemedicine Association. She is a past board member of the American Hospital Association, the American Public Health Association, and The California Endowment, the largest health care philanthropy in the state. Dr. Coye was elected to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine in 1994. She received her Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health degrees from Johns Hopkins University and also has a Master of Arts degree in Chinese history from Stanford University.

From the Nonprofit

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