Philanthropedia Blog

Minnesota Workforce Development Partnership: #1 Goodwill Easter Seals

May 2nd, 2012 by admin 1 comment »

Today we honor the #1 expert-identified workforce development nonprofit in Minnesota: Goodwill Easter Seals. Read about how Goodwill Easter Seals helped numerous clients secure a job during the recession:

 Ron worked as a printer for 11 years but lost his job due to the recession.  For several months, he collected unemployment insurance and worked temporary labor jobs to support his wife and two daughters. On the recommendation of a friend, Ron applied to the Construction Skills Training Program at Goodwill/Easter Seals, where he thrived. Thanks to his positive attitude and enthusiasm for learning, upon graduating, Ron was quickly hired by Urban Homeworks. Gradually, Ron’s responsibilities have increased, and today his duties include leading a home renovation crew, managing all properties, maintaining all vehicles and preparing volunteer sites. Additionally, he is training to become a Lead Abatement Supervisor. Ron often returns to Goodwill/Easter Seals to share his experiences with other men and women who are hoping to make a better life for themselves and their families.

(Read more here: http://www.goodwilleasterseals.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=16275&news_iv_ctrl=1201)

 According to our experts, Goodwill offers industry-specific training, transitional jobs, counseling, and placement that enable individuals with significant barriers to employment to successfully enter the workforce.  This well-established organization also engages in advocacy, innovative partnerships with educational institutions, and low-cost retail.

To learn more about Goodwill and their impact, read more expert reviews here.

Project for Pride in Living (PPL): #2 Expert-Identified Workforce Development Nonprofit in Minnesota

May 2nd, 2012 by admin No comments »

Our #2 workforce development nonprofit, Project for Pride in Living has helped numerous people with acquiring new skills and increasing their chances to obtain a job. Learn Angela’s story here:

Angela was a regular at PPL’s Computer Access Lab, learning basic computer skills, improving her typing, creating a resume, and eventually searching and applying for jobs online. When she received a call for a job interview, Angela scheduled a mock interview with PPL staff to help her prepare. Now Angela has a great job, and she’s thankful for the training she got from PPL that got her ready for it.

 (Read more success stories here: http://www.ppl-inc.org/page/ppl-stories-success)

According to our experts, PPL has changed the lives of thousands of families in disadvantaged communities through its package of job training, education, housing, and financial services. The organization’s employment training programs are customized to reflect their participants’ cultural backgrounds, and the skills they teach apply directly to career fields such as healthcare and banking.  Read more reviews from workforce development experts here to learn more about the great work PPL is doing.

HIRED: #3 Expert-Identified Workforce Development Nonprofit in Minnesota

May 2nd, 2012 by admin 2 comments »

Have you ever been worried that your skill sets are too narrow and don’t know what to do when your type of job or industry is closing down? Learn how HIRED helped Lynette Carlson acquire more skills to improve her job opportunities.

Lynette Carlson had been employed at SUPERVALU for more than 19 years when she learned that her job as a customer service representative in the IT department was being eliminated. The instability and uncertainty associated with unemployment was frightening enough, but what she feared most was that her skills would be too job-specific and she wouldn’t find a position that challenged her.

Diane Henderson, a counselor in HIRED’s Brooklyn Park office, focused on Lynette’s customer service experience and her “very strong organizational skills and an unabashed willingness to try new things.” Diane recommended two computer skills courses to round out Lynette’s IT background, and a class on being a leader and supervisor, which Lynette is quick to point out, has helped her develop more confidence as a manager. A temporary job at Laneco, a small janitorial service company in Brooklyn Park, was enough to show the project supervisor what Lynette could do. She was eventually offered a full-time position as the company’s Operation’s Manager.

Since leaving HIRED’s dislocated worker program, Lynette has taken the initiative to enroll in Spanish language courses to improve her ability to communicate with some of the employees. In addition to continuing her language courses, Lynette is currently looking into taking small business courses. Lynette said, “When you lose your job in mid-career, you never dream this kind of opportunity will be available. HIRED has helped me challenge myself in new ways that are very rewarding. I have a lot of responsibility here at Laneco, and I really enjoy having the opportunity to work within many facets of the company.”

(Read more about the work that HIRED has done in Minnesota at: http://www.hired.org/jobseekers/dislocated/profiles.htm)

According to our experts, HIRED is a regional leader in workforce development. Their high-quality programming and partnerships enable thousands of people annually to enter the workforce, including low-income, youth, immigrant, and refugee populations. Read more reviews from Minnesota workforce development experts here to learn more about the work HIRED is doing in Minnesota.

Emerge: #4 Expert-Identified Workforce Development Nonprofit in Minnesota

May 2nd, 2012 by admin No comments »

Emerge came in at #4 on the list. Imagine having three young children, ranging in age from 3 to 9 years old and not having housing. Read about how the Emerge Community Development of Minneapolis helped a father who was in that situation.

As a single father to three young children, ranging in age from 3 to 9 years old, Lee Cody Wilson definitely has moments when the weight of his responsibility feels particularly heavy. “There are some days when I tell my kids that Dad needs a timeout,” he said with a laugh. “But every day, we all just get up and do what we need to do.” Wilson, a recovering addict for 13 years, said he has had peace of mind since his family was accepted into Fathers and Children Together (FACT), an initiative funded by the Housing and Urban Development agency. The 24-month transitional housing and family development program serves about 45 homeless families, mostly single fathers with legal custody of their children. It’s administered by Emerge Community Development of Minneapolis in partnership with several local agencies. Today Wilson and his family are happy to have a home, after having spent two months in a Minneapolis shelter before moving into one of the Emerge Villages partner sites. Families are connected to programs that help them with employment, child support, chemical and mental health issues, said DeVon Nolen, director of the Emerge Villages program. About 90 children between kindergarten and eighth grade are tutored in math and reading during the school year, connect with mentors and participate in activities such as a weeklong residential camp in August. (Source: The Star Tribune)

(Learn more about Emerge here: http://www.emerge-mn.org/FACT)

In addition, according to our experts, EMERGE helps individuals successfully transition from correctional facilities to employment through its innovative job training and placement programs. Their holistic service model promotes community development and builds human capital. Read more reviews from Minnesota workforce development experts here to learn more about the great work EMERGE is doing.

Greater Twin Cities United Way: #5 Expert-Identified Workforce Development Nonprofit in Minnesota

April 25th, 2012 by admin No comments »

Nonprofit #5, Greater Twin Cities United Way partners with agencies in Minnesota to provide employment services. Learn how Bryon, a victim of a violent assault was able to pick himself up with the help of one of United Way’s partner agencies.

In 2005, Byron was the victim of a violent assault in South Minneapolis. “A bystander said she heard the sound of my head crack against the sidewalk,” Byron says. “I was in a coma for nearly 60 days. I was in rehab for another 3 or 4 months. I had to learn how to walk again, how to talk.”  Byron has lived in Minnesota for 47 years. He graduated from high school in Minneapolis, served in the Army Reserve and later worked in maintenance for several large companies in the metro area. “Before my accident, I knew how to sheetrock, do electricity, build houses,” he said. “The accident took all of that away.”

Byron received services at the TBI Metro Services, a division of Opportunity Partners, a United Way partner agency located in the Twin Cities. United Way supports the employment services-brain injury program as part of our goal to improve the financial stability of people in need. We also invest in the semi-independent living services and in-home help program as part of our health goal to help people remain independent. The employment program helps prepare people to rejoin the workforce and work independently, something Byron was eager to do. “I used to accept being disabled,” he said. “I would say, ‘I’m disabled. I can’t do it.’ Joining the program was an opportunity to come out of the ‘poor me’ mode.”

Clients like Byron receive training in work skills and ongoing in-home and community support to learn independent living skills so they can lead healthy lives. After training, clients can move to supported employment teams or independent job placement. In 2009, Opportunity Partners participants worked 149,902 hours on supported employment teams at more than 50 companies and nonprofits throughout the community, and 71 percent of 154 independently placed individuals maintained their employment for more than 90 days.  United Way recently contracted with Opportunity Partners, a social enterprise, to staff its janitorial and maintenance services. This allows us to help improve the financial stability of Byron and his co-workers through program investments and through purchasing services. Byron works on a team at our Minneapolis office.  Byron is proud of the progress he’s made. He started out doing light janitorial work. As he worked, some of his former skills returned. Now he’s using the carpet sweeper and the buffer, equipment he used before the accident. “My life has changed,” he said. “I have more self-worth. People here depend on me to get it done.”  He plays chess with a mystery opponent in the building, making a move and leaving a note that reads “Your move next—The Maintenance Man.” Trying to remember the moves helps me up here, he says, tapping his head.  Byron’s long-term goals include getting his independence back, getting a full-time job and getting off Social Security. “I don’t have that much time left,” he said. “Another 20 good years maybe…I’m looking for new and exciting things in my life.”  Last year, United Way invested in job training programs that helped nearly 6,500 people get and keep their job for least six months. Our investment in health programs also helped more than 109,000 older adults and those living with disabilities maximize their independence so they can remain in their homes.

(Learn more about them at: https://www.unitedwaytwincities.org/our_impact/success_stories/opportunity_partners/)

According to the experts, the Greater Twin Cities United Way makes an impact by supporting nonprofits and programs that help low-income people become self-sufficient. They conduct return on investment analyses and promote best practices. Read the expert comments here to learn more Greater Twin Cities United Way.

Press Release: 18 Minnesota Workforce Development Nonprofits Identified by 100 Experts

April 24th, 2012 by admin 11 comments »

Philanthropedia recently partnered with the Minnesota Philanthropy Partners to uncover expert-identified nonprofits working in workforce development in Minnesota, and we are pleased to share the results!

Workforce development is a topic that is relevant to many Minnesotans and people across the country. Developing strategies to increase gainful employment and support growing businesses is essential to building a healthy economy.

For Minnesota, there are two issues that make this cause particularly relevant:

  • In 2010, The Economic Policy Institute in Washington DC released a study stating that the black unemployment rate in Minneapolis was triple that of whites from the same area. That disparity is one of the highest in the nation. (Source: EPI). To help address this issue, we looked to highlight nonprofits focusing on equity as well as job and skill acquisition.
  • Minnesota is home to a large new immigrant population, many of whom choose to become small business owners. To identify resources for immigrant and non-immigrant entrepreneurs, we also focused on small business development and entrepreneurship training as a component of our research to identify high-impact nonprofits working in workforce development.

Philanthropedia surveyed 100 workforce development experts in Minnesota (with an average of 15 years of work experience in the field) to identify those organizations that were making the biggest impact. These experts (funders, researchers, nonprofit senior staff, government officials, etc.) identified 18 workforce development nonprofits (out of 123 total reviewed nonprofits) working in Minnesota. See the experts who participates in this research by clicking here

Which nonprofits were among the top?

We asked experts to recommend up to four high-impact nonprofits working in workforce development in Minnesota. These experts were asked to consider an array of nonprofits—those which served a range of populations (including youth, people with disabilities and immigrants) as well as offering a variety of services such as direct service, advocacy, training, education, and forms of support.

 

 

The following is the list of the expert-identified high-impact nonprofits working in workforce development in Minnesota. Click the link to visit each organizations profile and read expert reviews. Experts have commented on each nonprofit’s impact, other organizational strengths, and how each organization could further improve.


This week we will highlight the top 5 expert-identified Minnesota workforce development nonprofits through our blog and twitter.

If you are an expert, nonprofit organization, or individual, we invite your feedback on our research. You can reach Jasmine Marrow, Manager of Philanthropedia Research at jasmine.marrow@guidestar.org.

Nonprofit Research on Access to Healthy Food in Minnesota

February 21st, 2012 by admin 46 comments »

Overview

Philanthropedia is currently partnering with Minnesota Philanthropy Partners to conduct research to identify expert-recommended high-impact nonprofits that increase access to healthy food in Minnesota, in hopes of raising more awareness on this topic.

 

Did you know that two-thirds of the nation is overweight or obese? Supporting healthier eating habits and educating families and individuals about nutritious food choices are key components to fighting the obesity epidemic.

Scope of Research

In preparation for this research, we spoke with ten experts to better understand the issue area of access to healthy food in Minnesota. Their insights have helped define the scope of this research. (Thank you to those of you who offered your time and expertise!)

For this research, we are asking experts to recommend up to four nonprofits doing high-impact work across the state of Minnesota, and up to two start-up nonprofits that have the potential to do high-impact work.

In particular we are asking experts to recommend nonprofits that are:

 

  1. Working in the emergency food system
  2. Addressing geographic access problems
  3. Engaging in the agricultural policy system
  4. Working with school food programs
  5. Supporting farmers markets

 

1.    Emergency food system

The emergency food system is an established system in which the government, corporations and other donors provide monetary or food donations to food banks. The donated food or purchased food then gets distributed to the food shelves, food pantries, and organizations with meal programs.

One of the largest factors that limit the emergency food system from providing food to people in need is the lack of capacity of food shelves and other partner organizations to house the food stuffs. This particularly affects fresh produce donations because their shelf lives aren’t as long as dry goods. Another issue these organizations confront is to what extent they provide ethnically specific food. Minnesota is home to large populations of Somalis, East Africans, Southeast Asians, Latinos and Eastern Europeans. Providing food that is a part of a family’s traditional diet is not only culturally sensitive, but it can reduce the amount of wasted food that comes from giving families foods with which they are unfamiliar. Food shelves and food pantries often try to provide ethnically specific food, but they must balance the desire to accommodate ethnic palettes with the increased cost of stocking such items. Recently, there has also been a growing demand for healthier food options within the emergency food system. However, food distributors often struggle to meet this demand because they are often unable to control the type of food that is donated.

2.    Geographic access

For many years, low-income urban and rural communities have faced limited opportunities to purchase healthy food. The term food desert is often used to describe areas with severely limited access to grocery stores and healthy food options. For example, some residents on reservations in Northern Minnesota live almost an hour round trip from the nearest grocery store. Often, residents in these areas rely on expensive, fatty, processed foods sold at convenience/corner stores. At times, these corner grocery stores buy produce directly from the closest available large grocery store. As a result, the cost of produce at these convenience stores is highly prohibitive and the supply is low. One means of addressing this problem is by providing corner stores access to lower cost produce in order to increase their healthy food supply. City planning can also help low income communities gain access to healthy, affordable food in the long term.

3.    Reforming the agriculture system

It is important to understand the significant role that food and agricultural policy play in ensuring access to healthy food; in many ways policy drives nutrition.  For example, federal policies heavily subsidize corn and soy production. As a result, a large majority of food in the U.S. is a by-product of corn and soy (e.g. high fructose corn syrup).  Whereas, the production of fresh fruits and vegetables and food production on small family farms get very little institutional support.

Those supporting access to healthy food work to increase support for a variety of produce items as well as advocate on behalf of local, family farms.  Without these smaller farms, healthy produce would be severely limited. Types of support for local farms might include technical support, raising awareness of what subsidies are available, and also helping farmers advocate for themselves.

4.    School food programs

Schools are both one of the largest institutions that distribute food and a great place to educate about healthy eating habits. As a result, the “farm to school” movement developed to help schools purchase fresh produce from local farmers. Additionally, several organizations have developed programs to educate students about healthy eating so children can learn new habits and also potentially influence their parents’ eating habits.

5.    Farmers markets

Minnesota has a vibrant farmer’s market community which can be a great source of healthy, fresh food. However, most vendors at these markets aren’t equipped to accept food stamps. Therefore, to align incentives, there is a new effort underway to help vendors be able to accept and process food stamps. These markets play an important part in supporting local farmers and in making healthy food an affordable option.

 

Additional Research Details

In addition to the five areas outlined above, we are encouraging experts to consider the following types of organizations when making their recommendations:

  • Food banks, food shelves/food pantries, meal programs
  • Research organizations
  • Policy and advocacy organizations
  • Nutrition education organizations

Participation in the Research

Therefore, if you are a nonprofit expert working in the field of access to healthy food in Minnesota, you should have received an email from us with a link to our survey. The survey will be open until mid-March, 2012. We hope you will share your perspective and insights! If for some reason we have missed you and you think you have a valuable perspective to offer, please contact Jasmine Marrow at jasmine.marrow@guidestar.org, and we would love to send the survey to you to include your insights.

Additionally, we invite your feedback and thoughts about how you might frame this type of work. For those readers less familiar with this topic, we hope you learned something new and will check in again when we have the results of this research. Thank you all for your participation!

 

 

Nonprofit Research on Access to Arts and Culture in Minnesota

February 21st, 2012 by admin 2 comments »

Overview

As part of Philanthropedia’s custom research partnership with Minnesota Philanthropy Partners, we are working to identify expert-recommended high-impact nonprofits that increase access to arts and culture in Minnesota.

Minnesota has a diverse arts eco-system. The state has numerous community arts organizations and large arts institutes, as well as an established system of 11 regional arts councils to help make the arts more reflective of their communities.

Minnesota is a pioneer state in providing funding to the arts sector. In 2008, Minnesota voters passed the Legacy Amendment. The Amendment increases sales tax by three-eighths of one percent to distribute to four funds, including the Arts and Cultural Fund (ACHF)which receives 19.75% of overall Legacy funding.

Despite Minnesota’s demonstrated commitment to the arts and the existing arts infrastructure, many groups are still under-represented in the arts. Organizations across Minnesota are working to address those disparities and MN Partners has asked Philanthropedia to help identify nonprofits having the greatest impact in the field.

Scope of Research

In order to prepare for this research, we spoke with ten experts from key organizations working in the issue area of access to arts and culture in Minnesota. Their insights have helped define the scope of this research. (Thank you to those of you who offered your time and expertise!)

For this research, we are asking experts to recommend up to four nonprofits doing high-impact work across the state of Minnesota, and up to two start-up nonprofits that have the potential to do high-impact work.

In particular we are asking experts to recommend nonprofits that are:

  1. 1. Increasing arts and culture opportunities for populations who don’t have access to the arts
  2. 2. Directly supporting artists
  3. 3. Supporting under-resourced types of arts
  4. 4. Providing opportunities for non-arts people to participate in the arts

1.    Increasing arts and culture opportunities for populations who don’t have access to the arts

The populations least represented in the arts in Minnesota include communities of color, low-income communities, rural communities, immigrant and refugee communities, and people with disabilities. In Minnesota, the largest communities of color are the African American community, the Asian American community, the Native American community and the Latino community. Minnesota is also home to the largest Somali population in the United States[1] and the largest Hmong community in the world outside of Asia[2]. Unique, yet smaller immigrant communities in Minnesota include the largest group of Oromo – an ethnic group from Ethiopia – outside of that country, the second largest group of Tibetans in the U.S., and a concentration of West African refugees from Liberia and Sierra Leone.

While definable barriers such as cost and geographic isolation inhibit access, there are also physiological barriers that keep under-represented communities away from arts opportunities. For example, some individuals may not feel comfortable in arts settings because the work presented is not culturally relevant to them.  In instances like this, lowering some of the more tangible barriers may not result in increasing representation.  Hence, it is important to make the arts accessible in all stages of the process including curation, creation, funding, and evaluation. An example of this kind of inclusion would be if an organization were to develop a performance about traditional Asian narratives written, directed by and featuring Asian Americans.

2.    Directly supporting artists

Traditionally, it has been difficult for artists to earn a living wage for their craft, which can reduce the quantity and quality of art being produced. For this reason, it is important to directly support artists. The McKnight Foundation, a major funder in the arts and culture sphere, has recently shifted toward this strategy to fulfill its mission. Examples of support for artists include paying artists for their work, providing technical assistance to artists as small business owners, and helping communities understand artists’ value and identifying opportunities to collaborate. Therefore, part of this movement is to frame artists as individuals with unique, critical perspectives that can be useful in many facets of community life.

3.    Supporting under-resourced types of arts

Within the arts community, some types of artistic expression are often overlooked. For example community arts or less popular arts disciplines such as political theater, performance art, electronic arts, and video art are often overlooked for funding. Therefore, we decided to include “providing support for under-resourced arts disciplines” as part of our research.

4.    Providing opportunities for non-arts people to participate in the arts

The art world can be intimidating and, at times, exclusive. Many community members may feel that the arts are only accessible to artists or people with a specific arts talent. The experts with whom we spoke believe there is value in connecting people of all skill levels to the arts. And in fact, there is a growing movement to remove this particular stigma from this sector. One example of how one might invite widespread participation is to host a production in which all people who are interested are invited to be part of the show. Another example is to engage individuals as decision makers, empowering audiences and board members to choose what works they would like to see.

Additional Research Details

In addition to the four areas outlined above, we are encouraging experts to consider the following types of organizations when making their recommendations:

  • Traditional arts and culture organizations: theatre, dance, music, visual arts, television, media, and film organizations
  • Funders: organizations that fund nonprofit organizations or artists themselves
  • Policy and advocacy organizations: groups that organize people to support arts in the public policy space
  • Non-arts nonprofits: social service organizations that have an arts component but aren’t primarily arts organizations
  • Units of community education: schools or organizations that teach arts

Additionally, experts are encouraged to consider the following kinds of arts disciplines:

  • Design and architecture
  • Literary arts (comics, literature, poetry)
  • Media arts (Film/Video, new media, interactive computer based virtual art)
  • Performing arts (dance, opera, theatre)
  • Visual arts (ceramics, design, fashion, multi-media, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, 3D, 2D, fiber arts)
  • Music (blues, classical, country, electronic, folk, hip hop, international, jazz, rock/pop)

Participation in the Research

Therefore, if you are a nonprofit expert in the field of access to arts and culture in Minnesota, you should have received an email from us with a link to our survey. The survey will be open until mid-March, 2012. We hope you will share your perspective and insights! If for some reason we have missed you and you think you have a valuable perspective to offer, please contact Jasmine Marrow at jasmine.marrow@guidestar.org, and we would love to send the survey to you to include your insights.

Additionally, we invite your feedback and thoughts about how you might frame this type of work. For those readers less familiar with this topic, we hope you learned something new and will check in again when we have the results of this research. Thank you all for your participation!

Learn more about arts, culture and access in Minnesota:

The Legacy Amendment

 


[1] The McKnight Foundation “Immigrant Gateway: Framing the Issue” accessed in Feb 2006 at http://www.mcknight.org/hotissues/framing_immigrants.aspx and League of Women Voters and Minnesota’s Education Fund.  “Immigration in MN: Changing Faces Changing Communities.” Accessed February 2006 at:

http://www.lwvmn.org/EdFund/ImmigrationInMinnesota.asp.

[2] Fettig, David and Rolnick, Arthur J. “Credit Availability: A snapshot of the Hmong business community in Minneapolis and St. Paul.”  Accessed in Feb 2006 at: http://Minneapolisfed.org/pubs/cd/03-1/credit.cfm.

 

Custom Research for Minnesota Philanthropy Partners

February 21st, 2012 by admin 1 comment »

In 2011, Minnesota Philanthropy Partners commissioned Philanthropedia to conduct custom research to identify expert-recommended high-impact nonprofits in Minnesota focused on the environment and workforce development. The results for the environment research were published in November 2011 in their flagship publication, MNSights, and MN Partners will be featuring the workforce development results in the spring issue of MNSights (April 2012).

We are pleased to announce that we are partnering with MN Partners once again to identify expert-recommended high-impact nonprofits working in Minnesota. In this round of research, we will explore two new issue areas: access to healthy food and access to arts and culture.

Our custom research program gives community foundations, like MN Partners, and other organizations the opportunity to uncover nonprofits in their community making a significant impact on the issues local community members care about. Philanthropedia’s high quality research can be shared with donors to encourage them to fund the organizations doing the most outstanding work in their community.

If you’re interested in learning more, please contact Jasmine Marrow, at jasmine.marrow@guidestar.org or 650-200-3705.

 

Saying Goodbye

February 1st, 2012 by dawn No comments »

February 2, 2012 is my last day with Philanthropedia (at GuideStar). I will be leaving my position as Manager of Philanthropedia Research and return home to Hong Kong (where I grew up) to spend time with my parents and then work in the microfinance sector in China.

I have been with Philanthropedia since the idea of crowd-sourcing expert opinions to identify top nonprofits started. We were all still in school at that time and I couldn’t have asked for a better experience post-graduation. The process of getting incorporated, getting funding and backing from the Hewlett Foundation, proving our methodology, getting thousands of experts to participate in our research, and finally being acquired by the nonprofit data-provider, GuideStar, has truly been incredible. I am extremely grateful for all the experts who have shared their time and knowledge with me, the interns who have helped us out with our research, and my colleagues who have provided me with the strongest mentorship and support.

My replacement is Jasmine Marrow. She has a masters degree in Public Policy and have previously worked at Great Oakland Public Schools (an education advocacy nonprofit), and San Francisco Parks Trust (an urban greening nonprofit). I am confident she will continue with the high quality research Philanthropedia has delivered and continue to expand into more issue areas.

Thank you for everyone who I’ve interviewed, spoke, or worked with. It really has been a pleasure!

All the best,

Dawn

 



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