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Archive for January, 2012

Global Fund for Women (GFW) #1 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 16th, 2012

Today we recognize the #1 expert-identified violence against women nonprofit: Global Fund for Women.

Global Fund for Women works with grassroots organizations to identify and fund solutions for issues surrounding violence against women.  By funding women’s organizations of all sizes around the world, GFW has an impact on local, national, and international levels.  Read more about the organizations and women they impact below:

Marceline Mwamuye had a busy weekend. On top of planting maize and tending to her farm animals, she worked with local fishery experts to dig a pond on her half-acre of land in Kilifi County, an arid region along the coast of Kenya. Marceline will fill the pond with water, and place sacks of manure along the edges to provide nutrients so algae will grow and support a thriving fish population.

The fish in her pond won’t just benefit her household; she wants to use her new fishpond to teach others in her village to do the same. In Marceline’s community, most families rely on farming and fishing from the ocean for their livelihoods. However, with declining wild fish populations due to pollution, overfishing and climate change, they are forced to find alternatives.

“There used to be fish in the ocean, but now there is nothing,” said Marceline, who grows a variety of crops, raises chickens, goats and now, fish.

Through her involvement with Global Fund for Women grantee, Grassroots Organizations Operating Together in Sisterhood (GROOTS), Marceline uses her own farm as a demonstration plot to teach women about indigenous plants and organic farming methods that can reduce the cost of production, improve productivity and increase household income. The Humane Society of the United States is the nation’s largest and most effective animal protection organization—backed by 11 million Americans, or one in every 28. Established in 1954, The HSUS seeks a humane and sustainable world for all animals—a world that will also benefit people. We are America’s mainstream force against cruelty, exploitation and neglect, as well as the most trusted voice extolling the human-animal bond.

(Learn more about them at: http://www.globalfundforwomen.org/who-we-are)

Global Fund for Women has been providing needed funds to women’s organizations for over 20 years.  Experts say that without their support many amazing organizations would not exist today. They also cultivate women leaders and support equity though advocacy.  Their leadership in the field has been felt locally, regionally and internationally.  Read more about Global Fund for Women’s accomplishments and expert opinions here.

UN Women: #2 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 13th, 2012

Our #2 nonprofit, UN Women, is a coalition of UN bodies focused on women’s safety and well being.  Through technical and financial support, they help countries to develop and work toward a global standard of living for all women.  Their unique position as a UN body helps in holding countires accountable for progress in making significant steps toward ending violence against women.  Learn more about UN Women’s impact below:

UN Women works on several fronts towards ending violence against women and girls. This includes tackling its main root: gender inequality. Efforts are multiplied through advocacy campaigns and partnerships with governments, civil society and the UN system. Initiatives range from working to establish legal frameworks and specific national actions, to supporting prevention at the grassroots level, including in conflict and post-conflict situations. UN Women has also supported data collection on violence against women, facilitating new learning on the issue.

UN Women plays an active role in supporting the UN Secretary-General’s multi-year Unite to End Violence against Women campaign, launched in 2008. As a designated coordinator, UN Women works together with the UN system and other partners on the campaign’s regional components in Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean, expected to be launched in 2009.

(Learn more at: http://www.unwomen.org)

Experts agree that UN Women’s high-impact is due in part to its position within the UN.  They are able to facilitate real change at the country level by placing VAW issues directly on their agendas. The organization’s strong leadership is also a factor in its success.  To learn more about UN Women and to view more expert comments, click here.

V-Day: #3 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 12th, 2012

V-Day, our #3 nonprofit, combines activism and the arts in a successful combination that grows the VAW movement and generates ample funding for direct programming. V-Day offers over 5400 events each year; most notably its numerous productions of the Vagina Monologues.  They also engage in activism and program provision around the world.  Read more about V-Day’s campaigns and events below:

In late 2001, V-Day launched a campaign called “Afghanistan Is Everywhere” through which V-Day 2002 Organizers from the Worldwide and College Campaigns were asked to provide information at their events about the plight of the women in Afghanistan who had no civil or human rights under the Taliban at that time. They were also encouraged to donate a percentage of their proceeds to Afghan women. The campaign, ‘Afghanistan Is Everywhere,’ focused on Afghan women with the broader intention to unite women worldwide by pointing out the similarities between the experiences of the women of Afghanistan and those of women and girls in other areas of the world and raised over $250,000 for the women of Afghanistan, opening schools and orphanages and providing education and healthcare.
The success of that campaign evolved into what is now the annual V-Day Spotlight. Each year V-Day spotlights a particular group of women who are experiencing violence with the goal of raising awareness and funds to put a worldwide media spotlight on this area and to aid groups on the ground who are addressing it. In 2012, V-Day’s Spotlight Campaign will be on the Women and Girls of Haiti.

(Learn more at: http://www.vday.org/ar2011splash.html)

Experts have hailed V-Day for its amazing fundraising abilities and its ability to bring VAW issues to new audiences.  The organization has cultivated a global voice that it uses to influence policy, grow the movement, and empower woman everywhere. To learn more about V-Day and what experts had to say about the organization, click here.

 

International Rescue Committee (IRC): #4 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 11th, 2012

The # 4 violence against women nonprofit, International Rescue Committee has been an asset to the international relief community for nearly 80 years.  Around the world, the International Rescue Committee helps survivors of violence heal and works with communities and institutions to break the cycle of violence. Below is one woman’s story of how IRC helped to transform her into a support system for other women:

A guest post from Madeleine Rene, who volunteers for the International Rescue Committee in Haiti, educating women on their rights and ways to prevent violence:

I’m a native of Petit Goave, Haiti. I am 30 years old. When I was 12, I witnessed the rape of my older sister, which caused her death. As I grew up I felt the need to fight against rape which was very common where I lived.  When I was 18, my partner beat me but I knew nothing about my rights. It was only when I joined (the Haitian Women’s organization) KOFAVIV that I overcame this problem. I would no longer accept my situation and I told myself that even if I die my children would live in a better environment.

I feel very motivated to work as an IRC volunteer because it is an opportunity to help other women facing situations like mine. Many women think that men have the right to beat them because they pay the rent and bring home food. I participate in campaigns to educate women about their rights and how not to be abused by men. I participate in awareness campaigns and training sessions for women and girls in the Champs de Mars camp.

We also provide psychosocial support by listening to survivors of violence and helping them to find solutions to their problems. We also do referrals. Women at the Place Petion (Champs de Mars) know about the work we do. They are orphans who are sometimes forced into prostitution. If they experience domestic violence, they come to tell us.

We listen to them and together we create a security plan. Our presence here gives them hope. I get threats about my work from malicious men. They think that we want to destroy their homes and that we receive money from NGOs. So we have to take precautions not to go into areas where we could encounter problems, especially because the men are sometimes armed.

Some women agree with this way of thinking; sometimes when I speak to them of their rights, they tell me that I’m creating problems between them and their partners. Convincing certain women that it’s necessary to fight for their rights takes time.

I remember one woman who was in a difficult situation. She refused my assistance and did not want to talk. I thought of quitting but people in her neighborhood told me to insist. According to them, she was a victim of her husband’s acts of violence. She was very afraid of him because he was very violent. She could not go out and always stayed at home under his control. So I used a technique to follow her when she went to the market. Later, her situation improved. She’s currently an active member of KOFAVIV. I feel good when I see her attending meetings and we became friends.

Several things need to be improved or changed. Most women tell me that not being able to meet their needs and pay their rent is a cause of their problems. They are sometimes forced to remain under the domination of a man who abuses them. Many women lost their husbands after January 12 and were left alone, sometimes with two or three children, and they don’t know where they are going to live. Creating jobs for these women would be a good thing as it would give them the power to make their own decisions.

Many women and girls are not able to get an education. It would be useful to think of an educational and literacy project for them. There’s also a need to offer girls skills training, such as tailoring. This would help them to earn a living, live with dignity and be less vulnerable.

(Learn more about them at: http://www.rescue.org/)

IRC’s work to support and heal women in times of crisis has been invaluable. Experts agree that their contributions to refugee and post-war support make have made a significant impact.  To learn more about what the experts think of the International Rescue Committee and their work, read more expert reviews here.

Center for Women’s Global Leadership (CWGL): #5 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 10th, 2012

The # 5 violence against women nonprofit is Center for Women’s Global Leadership (CWGL). CWGL cultivates female leaders from around the globe in programs that range personal development to feminist economic perspectives.  The organization is also quite active in its efforts to raise awareness around the issue of gender-based violence.  Read more about CWGL’s history below:

The Center for Women’s Global Leadership (CWGL) was founded as a project of Douglass College in 1989. Since 1990, CWGL has fostered women’s leadership in the area of human rights through women’s global leadership institutes, strategic planning activities, international mobilization campaigns, UN monitoring, global education endeavors, publications, and a resource center.

CWGL’s current programmatic areas are: the promotion of women’s leadership, the advancement of feminist perspectives in economic and social rights and the elimination of violence against women, in local, national and international arenas.

CWGL is a unit of International Programs within the School of Arts and Sciences and is a member of the Institute for Women’s Leadership (IWL)—a consortium of women’s programs at Rutgers University that examines leadership issues and advances women’s leadership in education, research, politics, science, the arts, the workplace and the world. The member units of IWL are: the Center for the American Woman and Politics (CAWP), the Center for Women and Work, the Center for Women’s Global Leadership (CWGL), Douglass Residential College, the Institute for Research on Women (IRW), the Institute for Women and Art (IWA), the Office for the Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics, and the Women’s and Gender Studies Department.

(Learn more at: http://www.cwgl.rutgers.edu/globalcenter/leadership/leadership.html)

Experts agree that CWGL’s strong activism has been an important contribution to violence against women movement.  Without their clear vision and strong leadership, CWGL might not be the powerful campaigner that it is today. Read more expert opinions on the Center for Women’s Global Leadership click here.

International Center for Research on Women: #6 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 9th, 2012

The #6 violence against women nonprofit is the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW). ICRW utilizes its research for external program evaluation, action research, capacity building for program providers, and policy advocacy. They share vital information on topics ranging from forced marriage to HIV/AIDS.  To learn more about ICRW’s approach to reducing violence against women see below:

ICRW employs a multifaceted approach to reducing violence against women. We conduct empirical research to better understand the incidence of violence, costs associated with it and factors that lead to it. We also are building evidence on interventions designed to prevent violence against women, particularly comprehensive approaches that include economically empowering women, involving boys and men, protecting survivors of violence and rehabilitating men who are abusive. ICRW is examining the policy dimensions of violence prevention by evaluating the impact of and challenges to existing legislation and using our findings to advocate for stronger, more effective laws. Finally, ICRW participates in strategic regional and global networks that work to strengthen civil society and advance the field of preventing violence against women.

(Learn more at: http://www.icrw.org)

ICRW is a rich source of information for policy makers and practitioners aroung  the globe.  Experts agree that the organization’s sharp focus  and dedicated staff have helped propel it to its status as a high-impact nonprofit.  For more information and expert opinions on ICRW click here.

 

Promundo Gender Justice Network: #7 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 6th, 2012

The #7 nonprofit in violence against women, Promundo is changing the way that men think, the way that nonprofits provide programming, and the way that policies position women.  Through its strong programming, research, and advocacy, Promundo is accomplishing all those things and more. Read on to learn more about how Promundo is engaging the world in this very important conversation.

First Global Symposium on Engaging Men and Boys in Gender Equality

Diversity – this was the tone of the 1st Global Symposium on Engaging Men and Boys in Gender Equality, which took place from March 30th to April 3rd. Activists, researchers and other professionals, a total of 439 men and women from 77 countries, gathered in Rio de Janeiro to share experiences, views, and commitments for a constructing a more equal world.

The Symposium was the first global event dedicated specifically to the engagement of men and boys and brought together representatives from NGOs, government/public agencies, UN agencies and universities, among others. It offered the opportunity for these different actors to reflect about past and current initiatives and challenges as well as to collectively define lines of action to increase the scope of efforts to reach men and boys.

(Learn more about them at: http://www.promundo.org.br/)

Promundo is based in Brazil, but their work spans the globe. Experts have called Promundo an innovator in the field and their studies and evaluations are highly regarded. In addition to their research and advocacy components, they provide programming for young men, to shift their gender biases, and to young women, so grow their leadership and build awareness around inequity. Read more about what experts think of Promundo and their work here.

 

Women’s Refugee Commission:#8 Expert-Identified Violence Against Women Nonprofit

January 5th, 2012

Women’s Refugee Commission, our #8 violence against women nonprofit, works  to increase safety and long term well being for refugee women and girls.  They do this by influencing international policy, working to create safe spaces for women within refugee camps , and by providing direct programming.   Read more about WRC’s powerful history below:

As a founding member of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, the Women’s Refugee Commission was instrumental in making SCR 1325 a reality. Over the past 11 years, we have continued to push for full implementation of the resolution, as well as a broadening of the resolution’s impact. We work to hold UN member countries responsible for implementing the resolution and to ensure that refugees and internally displaced women and girls are given a voice in the peace process.

Despite the achievements seen to date, progress by the international community has been ad hoc and often limited to policy documents rather than lived reality on the ground. Read “UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security: High Hopes, Unmet Expectations,” our reflections on the 10th anniversary of SCR 1325, to learn more. This year’s debate is covered in our blog post “An Inside Look at Women, Peace and Security.” For detailed recommendations on actions the Security Council could take right now, read the NGO Working Group’s November 2011 Monthly Action Points.

As Shreen Abdul Saroor, a 2008 Women’s Refugee Commission Voices of Courage Award recipient directly affected by war in her home country of Sri Lanka, said, “During [the] 2002 peace process in Sri Lanka there was not a single woman at the main negotiating table and if…there will be a peace process in my country we need to have 50 percent women at the main table…With the help of the Women’s Refugee Commission and other dedicated organizations I have great hope that these ambitions could be achieved.”

The Women’s Refugee Commission is working to ensure that the UN and its members fully support and recognize the work of women like Shreen, who are the key to putting their communities and countries back on the path to peace and security.

(Learn more about them at http://www.womensrefugeecommission.org)

According to experts, WRC is a powerful force in the international policy arena; bringing gender-based violence issues to the forefront of many countries’ political radar.  They are praised for being equally effective on the ground as they are in politics.  Many of their wins are practical, meaningful changes that make life safer for refugee women and girls.  See more expert comments here.

 

Press Release: 15 Top International Working in Water, Sanitation & Hygiene by 116 Experts

January 4th, 2012

“Almost half of the developing world’s population – 2.5 billion people – lack improved sanitation facilities, and over 884 million people still use unsafe drinking water sources.” –UNICEF

Like clean air, most of us living in developed countries take the availability of clean water for granted. However, almost half of the developing world’s population – 2.5 billion people – lack improved sanitation facilities, and over 884 million people still use unsafe drinking water sources. (Source: UNICEF) Poor water, sanitation, and hygiene have many serious repercussions. Children- and particularly girls-can’t attend schools because their schools lack private and decent sanitation facilities. Women are forced to spend large parts of their day fetching water, leaving children unattended in homes. And 3.5 million people die each year (three million of whom are children) because of water-borne diseases. (Source: World Water Relief)

Over the past two months, Philanthropedia surveyed 116 experts working in water, sanitation, and hygiene (with an average of 14 years of work experience in the field) to identify those organizations that were making the biggest positive impact in the field.

Philanthropedia’s experts (funders, researchers, nonprofit senior staff, consultants, etc.) identified 15 top nonprofits (out of 106 total reviewed nonprofits) making an impact at the international level. Below is a graphical representation of who participated in our research. You can also see who our experts were by clicking here.


We asked experts to recommend nonprofits that work in the field of water, sanitation, and hygiene, in particular to recommend up to three nonprofits doing high-impact work across multiple countries/regions, and up to three nonprofits doing high-impact work in a specific country/region. These experts were asked to consider a range of nonprofits including those providing direct service, advocacy, litigation, research, education, and other areas.

The following is the list of the top-recommended high-impact nonprofits working in water, sanitation, and hygiene at the international level. “Agree” is the number of experts who agree that the nonprofit has had the most impact in the field. “Disagree” is the number of experts who disagree that the nonprofit has had the most impact in the field.

 

We invite you to visit the profiles of each of these top organizations on our website to read the expert reviews here. Experts commented on the impact each nonprofit has had, what the nonprofit’s other organizational strengths are, and how each organization could further improve.

This week we will highlight the top 8 high-impact international nonprofits working in water, sanitation, and hygiene through our blog and Twitter.

We also invite your feedback. Please tell us what you think and what experiences you’ve had with these great organizations! You can reach Jasmine Marrow, Manager of Philanthropedia Research at jasmine.marrow@guidestar.org.

 

Press Release: 14 Top International Nonprofits Working in the field of Violence Against Women by 77 Experts

January 4th, 2012

“Violence against women is perhaps the most shameful human rights violation, and it is perhaps the most pervasive. It knows no boundaries of geography, culture or wealth. As long as it continues, we cannot claim to be making real progress towards equality, development and peace.” - Kofi Annan, Former UN Secretary-General.

Globally, at least one in three women and girls is beaten or sexually abused in her lifetime. (Source: UN Commission on the Status of Women)

Over the past two months, Philanthropedia surveyed 77 experts working in the field of violence against women (with an average of 13 years of work experience in the field) to identify those organizations that were making the biggest positive impact in the field.

Philanthropedia’s experts (funders, researchers, nonprofit senior staff, consultants, etc.) identified 14 top nonprofits (out of 95 total reviewed nonprofits) making an impact at the national level. Below is a graphical representation of who participated in our research. You can also see who our experts were by clicking here.

Experts working in the field of female violence prevention were asked to recommend up to three nonprofits doing high-impact work across multiple countries/regions, and up to three nonprofits doing high-impact work in a specific country/region. These experts were asked to consider a range of nonprofits including those providing engaged in service, advocacy, litigation, research, education, and other areas. Nonprofits could focus on one or more of the following areas: peace and gender violence; domestic violence, battering, & marital rape; customary practices; and forced and early marriage. Specifically excluded from the survey were organizations working in human trafficking and reproductive health, rights as these topics may be further explored individually.  We also did not include and violence against men within the definition of gender based violence.

The following is the list of the top-recommended high-impact nonprofits working in the field of violence against women at the national level. “Agree” is the number of experts who agree that the nonprofit has had the most impact in the field. “Disagree” is the number of experts who disagree that the nonprofit has had the most impact in the field.

 

We invite you to visit the profiles of each of these top organizations on our website to read the expert reviews here. Experts commented on the impact each nonprofit has had, what the nonprofit’s other organizational strengths are, and how each organization could further improve.

We will be highlighting the top 8 high-impact national nonprofits working in the field of violence against women through our blog and Twitter, so stay posted!

We also invite your feedback. Please tell us what you think and what experiences you’ve had with thesegreat organizations! You can reach Jasmine Marrow, Manager of Philanthropedia Research at jasmine.marrow@guidestar.org.

 


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